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RS2

RS2

With exceptional analysis capabilities for both rock and soil, RS2 is your go-to software for modeling and analyzing slopes, surface and underground excavations, groundwater seepage, consolidation and much more. Powerful, multi-core parallel processors allow you to solve complex finite element problems quickly and easily.

RS2

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RS2 (Formerly RS2 or Phase2) is a powerful 2D finite element program for soil and rock applications. RS2 can be used for a wide range of engineering projects including excavation design, slope stability, groundwater seepage, probabilistic analysis, consolidation, and dynamic analysis capabilities.

Complex, multi-stage models can be easily created and quickly analyzed – tunnels in weak or jointed rock, underground powerhouse caverns, open pit mines and slopes, embankments, MSE stabilized earth structures, and much more. Progressive failure, support interaction and a variety of other problems can be addressed.

One of the major features of RS2 is finite element slope stability analysis using the shear strength reduction method. This option is fully automated and can be used with various failure criteria, including Mohr-Coulomb and Generalized Hoek-Brown. Slope models can be imported or exported between Slide2 and RS2 allowing easy comparison of limit equilibrium and finite element results.

With 64-bit and multi-core parallel processing options RS2 can solve larger and more complex models in shorter times.

Software Screenshots

RS2 Figure 1: View failed elements and failure type in an SSR analysis in RS2.
RS2 Figure 1: View failed elements and failure type in an SSR analysis in RS2.
RS2 Figure 1: View failed elements and failure type in an SSR analysis in RS2.
RS2 Figure 2: Displacement contours for geotextile reinforced ramp.
RS2 Figure 2: Displacement contours for geotextile reinforced ramp.
RS2 Figure 2: Displacement contours for geotextile reinforced ramp.
RS2 Figure 3: The Kersten Lecture: supported tunnel excavation.
RS2 Figure 3: The Kersten Lecture: supported tunnel excavation.
RS2 Figure 3: The Kersten Lecture: supported tunnel excavation.
RS2 Figure 4: Show model yield zones in probabilistic analysis.
RS2 Figure 4: Show model yield zones in probabilistic analysis.
RS2 Figure 4: Show model yield zones in probabilistic analysis.
RS2 Figure 5: Complex cofferdam seepage analysis: pore pressure results with flowlines.
RS2 Figure 5: Complex cofferdam seepage analysis: pore pressure results with flowlines.
RS2 Figure 5: Complex cofferdam seepage analysis: pore pressure results with flowlines.
RS2 Figure 1: View failed elements and failure type in an SSR analysis in RS2. RS2 Figure 1: View failed elements and failure type in an SSR analysis in RS2. RS2 Figure 2: Displacement contours for geotextile reinforced ramp. RS2 Figure 2: Displacement contours for geotextile reinforced ramp. RS2 Figure 3: The Kersten Lecture: supported tunnel excavation. RS2 Figure 3: The Kersten Lecture: supported tunnel excavation. RS2 Figure 4: Show model yield zones in probabilistic analysis. RS2 Figure 4: Show model yield zones in probabilistic analysis. RS2 Figure 5: Complex cofferdam seepage analysis: pore pressure results with flowlines. RS2 Figure 5: Complex cofferdam seepage analysis: pore pressure results with flowlines.

Product Highlights

  • What’s new in RS2 v9.0
  • Material Models
  • Model Creation
  • Shear Strength Reduction
  • Groundwater Seepage Analysis
  • Probabilistic Analysis
  • Joint Network Analysis
  • Designing Supports
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What’s new in RS2 v9.0

RS2 v9.0 is a significant upgrade to the previous version (Phase2 v8.0), featuring improvements for analysis in both rock and soil.

Analysis in Rock

RS2 has earned a reputation as the leading FE program for rock by offering a multitude of unique modeling and analysis features:

  • Joint Networks
  • Total Stress Analysis
  • Tunnel Support Design
  • SSR for Jointed Networks
  • Support Types (bolts, liners, composite liners, piles)
  • Support Capacity Plots

RS2 v9.0 expands on this by introducing several new features:

  1. Anisotropic rock mass
  2. New support-capacity curves
  3. Tunnel Wizard
  4. Material-dependent joint strength
  5. Stress transform calculator

Analysis in Soil

Building on the program’s success in the field of rock engineering, RS2 v9.0 broadens the range of geotechnical applications for which the program can be used.

The major additions to the program, which greatly increase its application to soils problems are:

  1. Fully-coupled Biot theory (hydro-mechanical coupling)
  2. Seepage analysis (transient and steady-state)
  3. Dynamic Analysis
  4. New soil material models for sand and clay

Material Models

Material models for rock and soil include Mohr-Coulomb, Generalized Hoek-Brown and Cam-Clay. Powerful new analysis features for modeling jointed rock allow you to automatically generate discrete joint or fracture networks according to a variety of statistical models.

Model Creation

Model creation and editing is easy in RS2 with powerful CAD-based modeling features for defining the model geometry. Boundaries can be defined by:

  • drawing with the mouse
  • entering coordinates in a prompt line
  • entering coordinates in a spreadsheet dialog
  • importing from a DXF file or other file types

As with most CAD programs, features such as grids, snapping, and undo are implemented to greatly simplify the process. Any person who has used a CAD program like AutoCAD will have no problem understanding and using the RS2 geometry modeler.

RS2 incorporates state-of-the-art editing tools which allow you to perform simple or complex editing tasks with a few mouse clicks. Boundaries and other entities can be moved, deleted, copied, stretched etc. Convenient right-click shortcuts are available for most editing options.

RS2 also features model creation tools to help with boundary simplification, geometry cleanup, and much more.

Shear Strength Reduction

One of the most exciting features of RS2 is finite element slope stability using the Shear Strength Reduction (SSR) method. This option is fully automated and can be used with either Mohr-Coulomb or Generalized Hoek-Brown strength parameters. With a single mouse click, you can run the SSR analysis and determine the critical strength reduction factor (safety factor) of a slope.

The SSR method has many advantages over the traditional limit equilibrium methods of slope stability. For example, SSR analysis does not require any assumptions about the shape or location of the failure surface. The SSR method will automatically determine the most critical failure mode and the corresponding safety factor.

For more information about SSR analysis with RS2 see the Shear Strength Reduction Overview topic in the RS2 Online Help.

Groundwater Seepage Analysis

RS2 includes steady-state and transient, saturated-unsaturated finite element groundwater seepage analysis built right into the program. Coupled solid-fluid formulation is also available for consolidation problems. There is no need to use a separate groundwater program; the seepage analysis is fully integrated with the stress analysis in RS2. The pore pressures computed from the groundwater analysis are automatically used in the stress analysis to compute effective stress.

Other quantities are also calculated such as flow rate, hydraulic gradient and discharge velocity. The groundwater seepage analysis in RS2 can be used as a standalone groundwater program, independently of the stress analysis functionality.

Probabilistic Analysis

RS2 offers probabilistic analysis using the point estimate, Monte Carlo, or Latin Hypercube methods.

For an RS2 probabilistic analysis you must define one or more input random variables (e.g. material strength, modulus, etc.). You can define material properties, joint properties and field stress as random variables. Only the mean and standard deviation need to be defined, the statistical distribution of each variable is assumed to be normal.

Joint Network Analysis

Joint network modeling is a powerful feature in RS2, which allows you to easily generate two-dimensional networks of joint boundaries to simulate patterns of natural or induced jointing in rock masses.

Joint networks can be generated according to a variety of statistical or deterministic models, including:

  • Parallel Deterministic
  • Parallel Statistical
  • Cross Jointed
  • Baecher
  • Veneziano
  • Voronoi

Designing Supports

RS2 offers a wide range of support modeling options. Liner elements can be applied in the modeling of shotcrete, concrete, steel set systems, retaining walls, piles, multi-layer composite liners, geotextiles, and more. Liner design tools include support capacity plots, which allow you to determine the safety factor of reinforced liners. Bolt types include end anchored, fully bonded, cable bolts, split sets, and grouted tiebacks.

Bolts

  • End Anchored (e.g. rock bolts)
  • Fully Bonded (e.g. soil nails)
  • Plain Strand Cable
  • Swellex / Split Set
  • Tieback

Liners

  • Simple liners (e.g. a single layer of shotcrete)
  • Composite Liners (e.g. liners consisting of multiple layers of material)
  • Pile walls (e.g. a structural beam element with a joint on both sides)
  • Geosynthetic support such as geogrids and geotextiles
  • Reinforced concrete
  • Cable Truss
  • Struts

Liners may consist of beam elements which can resist axial, bending and shear forces, or truss elements which only possess axial properties. In all cases, the basic support properties of the liner are entered in the Define Liner Properties dialog.

Reinforced Liners

The reinforced concrete liner type greatly simplifies the task of modeling composite two-component liner systems such as reinforced concrete, or steel sets and shotcrete.

Piles and Geosynthetics

The Structural Interface option in RS2 allows you to model support which has a sliding interface (joint) on BOTH sides of the support element. This can be used to model:

  • Pile walls
  • Geosynthetics (e.g. geogrids, geotextiles, etc.)
  • Other support types with a sliding interface on both sides

Schematically, a Structural Interface consists of a support element sandwiched in-between two joint elements.

Getting Support
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