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Lateral / Axial Resistance Graphs

LATERAL RESISTANCE GRAPH

The Lateral Resistance Graph is the lateral resistance against sliding at each sliding depth, where the sliding depth is based on the pile length divided by the Number of Intervals as set by the user.

When the Lateral Resistance Graph is being computed using the Max Allowable Lateral Displacement Analysis, the same procedure is used as described in the Soil Displacement section of Displacement where the Max Allowable Lateral Displacement is applied from the ground surface to the sliding depth.

The procedure is the same for the Ultimate Lateral Resistance Analysis except that the displacement will be increased until the ultimate lateral resistance or Ultimate Soil Cutoff is reached at the selected sliding depths. In the case of laterally loaded piles, substantial movement (over one meter) is usually required in order to mobilize transverse resistance in the pile. For these cases, the Ultimate Soil Cutoff can be used to restrain the soil displacement in the model to within tolerable limits. In some cases, the model may reach ultimate capacity at lower values. In some cases, the Ultimate Soil Cutoff can be used as an additional "Max Allowable Lateral Displacement" to compare two analyses with different soil movements.

NOTE: The Ultimate Soil Cutoff will carry over to Slide when importing an RSPile file for analysis, so be sure to set this value in RSPile before you import the file into Slide if you want to perform an Ultimate Analysis.

AXIAL RESISTANCE GRAPH

The Axial Resistance Graph is the axial resistance against sliding at each sliding depth where the sliding depth is based on the pile length divided by the Number of Intervals as set by the user.

When the Axial Resistance Graph is being computed using the Max Allowable Axial Displacement Analysis, the same procedure is used at each sliding depth as described in the Soil Displacement section of Displacement. The Max Allowable Axial Displacement is applied from the ground surface to each of the tested sliding depths.

The procedure is the same for the Ultimate Axial Resistance Analysis except that the displacement will be increased until the ultimate axial resistance is reached at the selected sliding depths. Although typical soil models reach the ultimate axial displacement at relatively small soil displacements, some models may require excessive amounts of soil displacement to reach the ultimate capacity. For these cases, the Ultimate Soil Cutoff can be used to restrain the soil displacement in the model to within tolerable limits.

The Ultimate Soil Cutoff is only used when the model exhibits excessive soil movement, unlike the Max Allowable Axial Displacement. The model may reach ultimate capacity at much lower values. The Max Allowable Axial Displacement will be used immediately to try to achieve the maximum axial resistance set by design tolerances. If convergence cannot be reached from the Max Allowable Axial Displacement, the soil displacement will be decreased until the model converges.


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